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A CHRONOLOGY OF GENERAL EDUCATION AT QUEENS COLLEGE

  • 1937-1972 | The Prescribed Program

    “The curriculum is divided into three major parts: Part I is prescribed and includes approximately half of the required credits for the degree; Part II is the field of concentration and requires one-fourth of the credits for a degree; Part III consists of grouped electives and covers approximately the last quarter of the requirements for the degree… Progress will be measured in most large units by achievement rather than by completion of a set number of hours of attendance and study. Students will therefore be required to pass comprehensive examination upon the completion of large units of work, in addition to the specific course examinations held at the end of each semester. The symbols, C.E., indicate the units of work in which comprehensive examination are required.” – 1937-38 Bulletin

    The Program of Studies

    The Prescribed Program

    • Basic Information
      • Science Survey 1, 2 (B.A.) or Physics 1, 2 (B.S.)  [6 credits]
      • Contemporary Civilization 1, 2, 3, 4 (C.E.)  [12 credits]
      • Survey of Literature and the Arts (C.E)
      • English 1, 2, 3, 4   [8 credits]
      • Art 1, 2   [2 credits]
      • Music 1, 2  [2 credits]
    • The Acquisition of Primary Skills
      • Mathematics 1, 2, or 02, 03, 4  [8 credits]
      • Language 1, 2, 3, 4   [12 credits]
      • a. English 5, 6 [4 credits] b. Public Speaking 1, 3 or 2, 3  [2 credits]
    • Health and Recreation
      • Physical examination
      • Hygiene 5 (Lecture)  [1 credits]
      • Hygiene 1, 2, 3, 4, Corrective Exercises and recreational activities  [4 credits] (Hygiene 1-5 changed to Physical Education 1-5, 1940-41 Bulletin)

    Total Prescribed Credits: 61*

    • The Concentration For The Degree (C.E.)
      • Intensive, graded study in the arts or in the sciences of in a field of criticism subject to the approval of a faculty committee.
    • Grouped Electives
      • Electives from any field grouped around one of more intellectual interests or vocational objectives and subject to the approval of a faculty committee.
    • Comprehensive Examinations and Reading Tests (1940-41 Bulletin)
      • Contemporary Civilization
      • Language, Literature, and the Arts
      • Field of Concentration
      • Reading Test in Foreign Language

     
    *The Prescribed Program underwent a number changes:

    From the 1969-70 Bulletin:

    The Prescribed Program

    • Mathematics-Sciences  [6-11 credits]
      • BIO 1-2 or 4-5, CHEM 3-4 or 9-10, GEO 1-2, PHYS 1-2 or 5-6, or MATH 3,5
    • Communication Arts and Sciences  [3 credits]
      • CAS 1
    • Contemporary Civilization  [6 credits]
      • CC 1, 2
    • Composition  [3 credits]
      • English 1
    • English Literature  [6 credits]
      • English 3 or 4 plus 5
    • Foreign Language  [9 credits]
    • Art  [2 credits]
      • Art 1 or Art 48 and 49
    • Music  [6 credits]
      • Music 1 and 2 or Music 3 and 4 or Music 5
    • Physical Education  [3 credits]
      • Physical Education 1 plus 2 from Physical Education 2, 3, or 4
    • Health Education  [1 credits]
      • Physical education 5

    Total Prescribed Credits: 41-48

    From the 1970-72 Bulletins:

    The Prescribed Program

    • Mathematics  [0-3 credits]
    • Science  [0-12 credits]
    • Communication Arts and Sciences  [3-6 credits]
    • Social Science  [6 credits]
    • English  [3-9 credits]
    • Foreign Language  [0-14 credits]
    • Art  [2 credits]
    • Music  [2 credits]
    • Physical education  [3 credits]

    Total Prescribed Credits: 19-57


  • 1972-1976 | Freedom of Choice

    “Aside from the major and English 1 for those students who have demonstrated their need for it, students have freedom of choice.” – 1972-73 Bulletin

    “As departments increased the number of pre-requisites they imposed on their majors, the number of free electives shrank…these inadequacies led, as we all know, to complete disintegration as students, abetted by “progressive” members of the faculty (at a meting of the Curriculum Committee, a dean openly denied the desirability of required courses on the grounds that he at any rate didn’t know what knowledge a person needed to be considered educated), gleefully proceeded to dismantle what had been a noble structure. It had, perhaps, outlived its time.” – Paul Klapper’s Dream by Dr. Konrad Gries

    The Bachelor of Arts Degree:

    • The degree of Bachelor of Arts is granted to all matriculated students who complete a total of 128 credits.
    • These 128 credits must include a unified group of courses known as the major.
    • Entering students will be expected to demonstrate competence in written English by passing a writing examination administered by the Department of English. Those who fail to demonstrate the desired competence are required to pass a semester course in writing on the level of the present English 1. Those students who fail to qualify for english1, E1 take English 01, E01 as a prerequisite to English 1, E1.
    • Aside from the major and English 1 for those students who have demonstrated their need for it, students have freedom of choice. In the interests of breadth and variety, however, they are strongly urged to consider the advisability of doing some work in each of the following areas:
      • literature, either as offered by the department of English or through courses in comparative literature and in foreign literature, in the original or in translation;
      • foreign languages, at least to the extant of acquiring a reading competency;
      • art appreciation or studio work;
      • music appreciation;
      • physical activities;
      • social science, either through work in Contemporary Civilization or through the basic courses in such departments as Anthropology, Economics, Education, History, Philosophy,  Political Science, and Sociology;
      • for those who do not intend to major in the sciences, courses offered especially for non-science majors by such departments as Chemistry, biology, Physics, and Mathematics.
    • The Major
      • The major is a concentration of study in a department or allied departments.
    • Electives
      • Students may complete the remaining credits needed for their degree by taking courses in any department they wish… Electives may be used to supplement the major or to fulfill interest in a totally different area.

  • 1976-1981 | Distributional Requirements

    “The degree of Bachelor of Arts is granted to all matriculated students who complete a total of 128 credits. These 128 credits must include basic skills and distributional requirements and a unified group of courses known as the major.” – 1976-77 Bulletin

    “1976 – Undergraduate tuition charged for the first time in CUNY history” – The People’s College on the Hill, Fifty Years at Queens College, 1037 - 1987

    • Basic Skills and Distributional Requirements
      • Entering students will be expected to demonstrate competence in written English on the basis of a writing examination administered by the Department of English. The basic sequence of writing courses consists of English 01, English 1, and English 6.0 (including English 6.1, 6.1, etc.). On the basis of the required writing examination, students may be exempted from English 1 or from the entire writing requirement, or may be assigned to English 01 as a prerequisite to English 1. Students taking English 1 may be exempted from English 6 by recommendation of the English 1 instructor or by retaking the English placement examination and receiving a high pass.
      • Entering students will also be expected to demonstrate competence in arithmetic and algebra, by having passed the 11th year algebra Regents examination. Students who do not meet one of these criteria are required to pass a course in mathematics at the level of Mathematics 06 or 08.
      • Students will also be required to take 24 credits of distributional requirements: eight credits (distributed among at least two departments) in each of the three academic division of the College.
    • The Major
      • A major is a concentration of study in a department or allied departments.
    • Electives
      • Students may complete the remaining credits needed for their degree by taking courses in any department they choose.

  • 1981-2009 | Liberal Arts and Sciences Area Requirements (LASAR)

    “The baccalaureate degree is granted to all degree students who complete a total of 128 credits, including basic skills and distributional requirements* and a unified group of courses known as the major, and meet the other baccalaureate requirements listed below.” – 1981-82 Bulletin

    • Basic Skills Requirements
      • English
      • Reading
      • Mathematics
      • Health and Physical Education
      • Foreign Language Requirement
    • Area Requirements**
      • Humanities I – 2 courses
      • Humanities II
      • Humanities III
      • Physical and Biological Sciences – 2 courses
      • Scientific Methodology and Quantitative Reasoning
      • Social Sciences – 2 courses
      • Pre-Industrial/Non-Western Civilization
    • The Major
      • A major is a concentration of study in a department or allied departments
    • The Minor
      • Some departments offer a minor – a program of 15 or more credits that students can take to supplement their major or to pursue an area of interest.
    • Electives
      • Students may complete the remaining credits needed for their degree by taking courses in any department they choose.

    *In the 1981-82 College Bulletin, curriculum requirements reflect a new structure (LASAR), however the curriculum itself is still referred to as “basic skills and distributional requirements”. In the 1982-83 College Bulletin, the phrase is changed to “basic skills and area requirements” and the term “Liberal Arts and Science Area Requirements” first appears.

    **LASAR underwent a number of changes:

    • In the 1982-83 Bulletin, “Area Requirements” became “Liberal Arts and Science Area Requirements”.
    • In the 1993-95 Bulletin, the term “LASAR” appeared as its acronym.
    • In the 1996-98 Bulletin, the baccalaureate degree required a total 120 credits - a reduction from the previous 128.
    • The QC Writing Requirement of English 110 and three additional “writing intensive” units was approved by the Academic Senate in 1996, and first appeared in the 1996-1998 Bulletin under “Basic and Advanced Learning Skills Requirements” as part of the English Composition requirement. It became effective for students entering Fall 1997.
    • In the 2007-2009 Bulletin, “Basic and Advanced Learning Skills Requirements” was changed to “Primary College Competencies”.

  • 2009-2013 | Perspectives on the Liberal Arts and Sciences (PLAS)

    “Effective Fall 2009, entering freshmen and transfer student will follow a revised curriculum that includes writing, mathematics, quantitative reasoning foreign language study, and Perspectives on Liberal Arts and Sciences, and a capstone or synthesis course (for students entering Fall 2010). Students who matriculated prior to Fall 2009 will complete their degree requirements the prior curriculum guidelines.” – 2011-2012 Bulletin

    “Unlike LASAR…the proposed areas of knowledge do not map directly onto the structure of the academic divisions… it is the central task of general education to enable students to make connections across course and disciplinary boundaries and thereby…develop a better understanding of the relationships and connections between all fields that intersect and overlap.’” – President’s Task Force on General Education 2004

    • Critical Academic Abilities:
        • Writing: English 110 and three additional courses designated as “Writing Intensive” (W).
        • Mathematics
        • Abstract/Quantitative Reasoning
        • Foreign Language
    • Perspectives on the Liberal Arts and Sciences
      • Core Areas of Knowledge and Inquiry:
        • Reading Literature – 2 courses
        • Appreciating and Participating in the Arts
        • Cultures and Values
        • Analyzing Social Structures – 2 courses
        • Natural Science – 2 courses, one with a lab
      • Global Contexts:
        • United States
        • European Traditions
        • World Cultures
        • Pre-Industrial Society
      • Upper Level Degree Requirement: Capstone or Synthesis course*

    * On April 14, 2011, the Academic Senate suspended the Upper Level Degree Requirement of a Capstone or Synthesis course for the Fall 2011 and Spring 2012 academic year. It remains suspended for all students under the PLAS curriculum.


  • 2013+ | CUNY Pathways at Queens College

    “Starting in Fall 2013, CUNY will implement the Pathways initiative across its undergraduate colleges. Pathways establishes a new system of general education requirements and new transfer guidelines across the University--and by doing so reinforces CUNY's educational excellence while easing student transfer between CUNY colleges. The centerpiece of this initiative is a 30-credit general education Common Core. Each CUNY college can require bachelor’s-degree students to take another 6 to 12 credits of general education through the College Option. Importantly, once fulfilled at one CUNY college, these general education credits will carry over seamlessly if a student transfers to another CUNY college.” – CUNY

    • Required Core
      • College Writing 1: English 110 (EC1)
      • College Writing 2 (EC2)
      • Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning (MQR)
      • Life and Physical Sciences (LPS)
    • Flexible Core
      • World Cultures and Global Issues (WCGI)
      • U.S. Experience in Its Diversity (USED)
      • Creative Expression (CE)
      • Individual and Society (IS)
      • Scientific World (SW)
      • An additional Flexible Core course
    • College Core (CUNY College Option)
      • Literature (LIT)
      • Language (LANG)
      • Science (SCI)
      • One additional course selected from the following:
        • Queens Core, Flexible Core, Life and Physical Sciences (LPS), or a Synthesis course (SYN)


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